My life has a superb cast but I can't figure out the plot.
~ Ashleigh Brilliant


Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Street Art, Part I


Since 2002, the town of Sheridan (our nearest community of any significant size) has displayed various sculptures all over town, indoors and out, some on display permanently, some on loan. During some of my weekly trips to town since getting my new camera, I've photographed most of my favorites (a majestic heron and a pair of romping fawns are still on my to-photo list), and wanted to share them. The won't all fit on one post, so here's Part 1...

"Blooming Amaryllis Bulb" by Sharles


This one's for Susan, my fellow former Kennebunk Ram! ;-) ...

"Summit CEOs" by J.C. Dye (Stanford, MT)

"Sonrise" by Bill Noland

"Shadow Walker" by Tammy Bality

This one's for you, Molly! :-)...

"Bella and the Bug" by Louise Peterson

"Quarter Double Bass" by Joe Burleigh

This one's in front of Tumbleweed, where I eat lunch when I'm in town...

"Raptoround: Standing Proud" by Chuck Weaver


Got a favorite?

Stay tuned for Part 2!

12 comments:

  1. They are all beautiful and interesting in their own way...can viewers play the bass if they choose?

    My favorite though, has to be the amaryllis bulb I love the color and the the close-up shot you took is spectacular.

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  3. I really shouldn't try to multitask; I'm getting all the blogs mixed up! What I meant to say:

    I love the "Blooming Amaryllis Bulb" but the "Raptoround: Standing Proud" is really stunning. Still trying to wrap my head around it. Thanks for sharing these!

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  4. Well, of course the dog is my favorite! The artist captured how dogs look at bugs and other such curiosities. I just love it!

    All of the sculptures are gorgeous. I'm simply amazed at what humans can accomplish. If only we would have that sort of beauty in all aspects of our lives.

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  5. Rose ~ Good question about the bass being playable! I don't think it is, but it never occurred to me to try! I'll have to do that the next time I'm in its vicinity! :-)

    I thought the amaryllis bulb would be your favorite in this batch! I love that color too, and the details. I'm glad you like the close-up shot, I was wanting the blue sky behind it instead of buildings or traffic! I think the blue of the sky really sets off the pink of the flower. I'm glad you liked them all, I think you'll really enjoy the next batch, too!

    VW ~ LOL - no problem, it's like juggling plates sometimes, trying to keep up with all the great blogs out there (especially during Vegan MoFo!)

    "Raptoround" is probably BW's favorite one, he has a special fondness for eagles, and that is one cool piece of art! I especially love the eagle's face and feathers, and was pleased with how they came out in the closeup photo.

    Molly ~ Really? You liked the dog one best? Whuddathunkit? ;-) The artist really did capture the posture and facial expression of a dog staring at a bug! Willow looks like that often, she's particularly captivated by insects. I really like that the artist didn't add a bug to the sculpture... Bella is staring at something a couple of feet away in space, making you wonder what exactly she sees!

    I agree about the amazing things humans can accomplish when they put their energy into creating instead of into destroying. I appreciate the beauty added to the world by creative, talented people.

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  6. Wow, are they amazing! I couldn't even pick a favorite.

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  7. Jennifer ~ Choosing a favorite isn't easy! I'm glad you enjoyed them all! Maybe you'll have a favorite in the next batch. :-)

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  8. They are all quite lovely! But I have to say that Bella and the Bug is my favorite. How wonderful to have all this art so close by! Thanks for sharing.

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  9. What an awesome program! Wish all towns did something like this.

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  10. Daphne ~ Bella's definitely got a lot of personality! I'm in awe of sculptors who are able to make their sculptures look so realistic. It looks like the most difficult art form to me.

    It is nice to have so much nice art close by (it's one of Sheridan's few redeeming features, lol). We also live near a wonderful art museum, The Bradford Brinton, and sometimes enjoy wandering through their gallery shop.

    Jamie ~ That would be nice, especially to have this kind of art on a town's main street or along their town common, where people can stroll by and admire it.

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  11. I normally like to be different than everyone else but I picked my favorite before reading the comments to I'm going to admit to having the majority opinion - definitely the Amaryllis. It is so delicate that when I saw the photo before reading the post, I actually thought it was a photo of a real flower!

    But my close second favorite was one no one else picked. I loved how "shadow walker" was strutting its stuff!!

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  12. Jo ~ Wow, this isn't your usual MO, jumping to the newest posts first! I was surprised to see you up here! :-)

    How can anyone not love that amaryllis? It's my favorite, too! Definitely very realistic (except in scale, lol) and gorgeous.

    I'm glad you picked Shadow Walker as your second favorite, I think that's one proud and pretty painted pony! :-)

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SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

  • THE HUMANE GARDENER ~ Nancy Lawson
  • THE WORLD WITHOUT US ~ Alan Weisman
There is still strong in our society the belief
that animals and the natural world have value
only insofar as they can be converted into revenue.
That nature is a commodity.
And that the American dream is one of unlimited consumption.
There are many of us, on the other hand,
who believe that animals and the natural world
have value by virtue of being alive.
That Nature is a community to which we belong
and to which we owe our lives.
And that the deeper American dream is one of unlimited compassion.

~John Robbins, "The Food Revolution"