My life has a superb cast but I can't figure out the plot.
~ Ashleigh Brilliant


Monday, July 22, 2013

Not Your Grandma's Potato Salad...

Unless your grandma makes her potato salad with black beans, sweet potatoes, fresh mint, arugula, lime juice... 

I know you were expecting my next post to be my first vacation post, and I promise I've been working diligently and will have it ready this week. But this post does have a vacation tie-in, so it kinda counts!

When we were in Victoria, BC we went for a stroll through a residential neighborhood and stumbled upon a little neighborhood grocery store that had lots of organic produce and a small deli. They had one vegan item in the deli - a sweet potato, white potato, and black bean salad made with a vinaigrette. We bought some and shared it at one of their outdoor tables, and since we got back I've been trying to find a recipe to replicate it so I don't have to guess at the seasonings (we think cumin was one) and liquids involved. No luck yet, but in my search I did find this one, which sounded pretty interesting, so last night we made it for dinner. And interesting it is! A very unusual combination of flavors, it might not be for everyone but we really enjoyed it and will be making it again, including when BW's folks visit next month. It's very healthy and pretty, too, and even more flavorful the next day! We shared some with our neighbor, who later demanded the recipe. :-)


I was a good little blogger who obeyed the rule in fine print on the online publication where the recipe appeared, emailing Condé Nast last night for permission to share it on my personal blog with a link back to the original. They wrote back this morning telling me I could link it for free, but if I re-printed it here they'd "license the text for a fee based on usage." Well, Mr. Condé and Mr. Nast are just going to have to find a way to get along without my usage fee, I'm afraid! So here's the link to the recipe...


We omitted the olive oil (and BW, who was in charge of roasting the sweet potatoes, neglected to sprinkle them with the salt and pepper before roasting them so I just added the full measurement of both to the dressing). Since this batch was just for us we blew off using the lime wedge garnishes (or as BW put it, "We ain't about garnishes, we're about eatin' our food!" LOL) We were a little dubious about serving it on a bed of arugula (or in our case, a bed of organic arugula and baby spinach mix, since that's all I could find), but we really liked the combo! Oh, and the mint came from our little organic herb garden, our first harvest from it ever! So we're rather proud. :-)

Enjoy, and I'll see you in Butte, MT (virtually speaking) later this week! :-)

21 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Doesn't it? The medley of flavors is complex and interesting. I wasn't sure about the combo, but it worked for us! We polished it off today at lunch and BW is already chomping at the bit for more!

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  2. This sounds really good and you're right, it's very pretty! I love sweet potato salad. We have a favorite with black beans & a cashew based dressing. So delicious!

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    Replies
    1. Would love to see your recipe, Molly - is it on your Noms board?

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    2. Yes it is! Here's the link-
      http://luminousvegans.wordpress.com/2013/05/11/sweet-potato-salad-with-tangy-ancho-chili-sauce-virtual-vegan-potluck/#comment-1404

      We did make a few changes to it, though. We cut out the cilantro & oil and used a sweet chili hot sauce instead of harissa. It turned out really good!

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    3. Thanks for the link, Molly, and for mentioning your tweaks to it - that does look and sound delicious! I've pinned and bookmarked it. :-)

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  3. it's a pretty salad...and so interesting!

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    Replies
    1. It is definitely both of those things, along with very flavorful!

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  4. It can be really exciting getting the first herb from a new herb garden can't it. Well done little mint.

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    Replies
    1. Yes it can, and in this case especially since we were sure our little herb garden had been obliterated by this spring's various windstorms, floods, hailstorms and even a frost (in June!) But it just kept bouncing back. We were gone when the basil and cilantro were at their best, but they flowered and are now just too gnarly to use. The thyme and rosemary look great, but I haven't had a need for them yet - but I will! :-) So, the mint won! And I must say, it's looked great all along, no matter the weather!

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  5. Oh my, that dish looks so flavorful with good food. I am copying it down and might just make it when I move to Utah -- barbara

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    Replies
    1. LOL, do they not have the ingredients in Kentucky? :-) Kidding, I'm assuming maybe you're too busy showing your house, or better yet - packing and getting ready to move! I haven't been able to keep up with other blogs since our trip, so I'm wondering if you sold your house! Utah is going to be such a big change from KY, but then - you're used to big changes. And what photo ops there will be out there!

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    2. P.S. I thought of you while I've been putting together my first vacation post, since Butte, MT is so filled with vernacular architecture (and I'll be sharing several photos of it!) :-)

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    3. Look for ward to your vernacular archi. photos -- barbara

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  6. That really looks yummy. I love all the colors. The mint makes it especially sound unusual. I also like the pretty plate you served it on. I know you were hoping I'd see the recipe in time to contemplate making if for Vicki but even if I had, I think this one might be too adventurous for a guest even if I had seen it in time. Especially since I haven't tried it myself!

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    1. I was a bit concerned about the mint myself, but now can't imagine it without it. All the flavors and textures really work together well, we thought (as did Carol!) Hope you'll make it for yourself, it may end up being something fun to bring to family gatherings or potlucks or feed to your next guest (since the small size of your apartment doesn't seem to deter them from coming to visit!) :-)

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    2. Meant to thank you for the compliment on our dish ware! :-) We were going to put it in our plain white salad bowls, but they were all in the dishwasher, so BW suggested we use these pasta bowls, and they do really set off the potato-bean salad prettily!

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  7. Never met a sweet potato I didn't like. Any-which-a-way to eat 'em is fine for me! Your dish is so colorful. Truly beautiful food! ;)

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    1. I had to learn to love them as an adult (detested them as a kid, though I wasn't a picky eater!), but now I do adore them and enjoy them in a variety of recipes. It really is a beautiful dish, isn't it? Talk about eating the rainbow! :-)

      Btw, I keep meaning to tell you that I have one surviving Plumeria (the shortest one, don't recall which color it is) - the hailstorms, late frost (in June!), heavy rains, and horrible winds did the other two in (I think the frost was the death blow, it even ruined a lot of veggie gardens around here). But the survivor has several leaves on it, so I'm hoping to keep 'er going! The succulents I planted on the south side also bit the dust, but the ones I planted in a pot are thriving. Go figure! Anyway, a disappointingly high attrition rate, but I guess it's to be expected when transplanting Florida plants to Wyoming!

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  8. Well, all I can say is, if it tasted half as good as it looked......;-).

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    Replies
    1. You only quote the Great Ones. LOL

      (And your subliminal message came through loud and clear - this WOULD go well with beer!) ;-)

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SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

  • THE HUMANE GARDENER ~ Nancy Lawson
  • THE WORLD WITHOUT US ~ Alan Weisman
There is still strong in our society the belief
that animals and the natural world have value
only insofar as they can be converted into revenue.
That nature is a commodity.
And that the American dream is one of unlimited consumption.
There are many of us, on the other hand,
who believe that animals and the natural world
have value by virtue of being alive.
That Nature is a community to which we belong
and to which we owe our lives.
And that the deeper American dream is one of unlimited compassion.

~John Robbins, "The Food Revolution"