My life has a superb cast but I can't figure out the plot.
~ Ashleigh Brilliant


Friday, October 3, 2014

SkyWatch Friday: Winged Flight & Bing Wright

Okay, I admit it, I took some poetic license with my post title. But "Red-tailed hawk sitting on a lamp post in the mist" simply doesn't sound as melodious with "Bing Wright." :-)

A Pensive Pose

It was a misty, drizzly day and our friend repeatedly stretched out his wings like this;
whether to shed water or take advantage of a free shower, we're unsure!

"They went that-a-way!"

I took the above photos with my telephoto lens. Here's one with my regular lens for perspective…


Our skies have been overcast and dreary most of the week, so no colorful sunrise or sunset photos for this SkyWatch post, I'm afraid. However, I've been saving this treat for just such an occasion. In case you're wondering who the Bing Wright in my post title is, he's a photographer who often takes photos of sunsets reflected in shattered mirrors, making them look like stained glass...


See more of Bing's "broken mirror/evening sky" (and other) photos here: 

And as always, enjoy more sky photos of all sorts here:

24 comments:

  1. Love the poetic license ~ Sweet shots for SWF!

    artmusedog and carol (A Creative Harbor)

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    1. Thanks, Carol! The hawk was beautiful, but I fear my skies were a lot less colorful than usual!

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  2. Beautiful hawk, but I really like the abstract broken mirror sunset. Pretty.

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    1. I know, me too - pity it's the one photo that isn't mine! (Keeping my eyes peeled for broken mirrors now, though!) :-)

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  3. Wonderful captures, and I enjoy rhyme myself from time to time...


    ALOHA from Honolulu
    ComfortSpiral
    =^..^= . <3 . >< } } (°>

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    1. Thank you! And I see you oft enjoy a rhyme, your comment being just such a time! :-)

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  4. Love the hawk in those soft moody skies. I suspect they do shower in the rain. We have often seen galahs hanging upside down in a shower of rain with their wings extended and are sure that they are washing their underarms(wings).
    Love the shattered glass magic, and am looking forward to seeing where you can take it.
    Another technique I have seen which fascinated me was putting a mirror on an artist's easil, and capturing something as a painting... If that makes sense.

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    1. You made me chuckle with the wonderful vision of the galahs using the rain to wash their 'pits! :-)

      And I love the idea of the photographing a scene in a mirror on an artist's easel, that is brilliant! (And yes, it makes perfect sense!) Now I wish I had an easel! :-) I won't be breaking any mirrors myself (my luck's been bad enough all on its own lately without borrowing trouble!!), but will put out the word that I would like any shattered mirrors that are about to be thrown away!

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  5. Such a great title, and a fitting post to go with it! Your lens really does a great job of catching far off shots. I always love seeing hawks sitting on things like lamp posts and often want to pull over just to try to get some photos of them. :)

    Bing Wright's photography is so pretty, and how creative! It does look like stained glass. I thought that's what it was when I first saw the picture you posted!

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    1. Thanks, Molly! My lens does do a great job, as long as I can manage to hold still enough! (I had to lean hard against one of our porch pillars to keep it steady for these!) We often see hawks sitting on fence posts and I have the same desire. Saw a great one on the trip to Havre, but there was no way to stop in time to get a photo.

      I think so too - found this picture (and an article about him that linked to his web site) on Pinterest, have you seen it there before? What a clever idea, I wonder how he came up with it. And did you see Elephant Child's comment about the cool technique she's seen with mirror and easel? Goodness, now just taking regular photos seems so unimaginative and boring! LOL

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    2. Oh, that would be a fantastic photo on an easel! People can be so creative. I didn't see Wright's work on Pinterest, or if I did I don't recall it. I'm glad you posted about it!

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  6. Whoa -- what an artful idea to use broken mirror reflections to record the sunsets. Your bird photos with comments was funny. Sorry about a week of dreary weather. -- barbara

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    1. If I come upon a shattered mirror, I plan to permanently prop it up on our patio to reflect the sunrises. :-) I didn't mind the dreary weather, I spent it reading, watching Netflix, and starting my fall cleaning! We don't get quite enough cozy weather in these parts, you ask me!

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  7. Thanks for sharing the Bing Wright photography! Beautiful and creative.

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  8. We get hawks in our yard periodically because of all our bird feeders (I've taken pictures). I know hawks have to eat too, but I hate to see one of our birds be dinner. Fortunately because of the climbing rose bush near by the little ones have a good hiding spot.

    I love the broken glass photography. Why can't I think of things like that?

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    1. I know, we don't have many songbirds here because of the lack of mature trees (and now, the time of year), but I worry for the bunnies and other wee critters in the field behind us. When we lived in Big Horn, it was the Sharp-shinned hawks we worried about. They really went after the little birds, whose company we enjoyed in abundance. It was amazing though - we'd have feeders, fence and trees full of singing birds and suddenly - nothing. Not a bird in sight, not a note of song to be heard, and then we'd see him - the Sharp-shinned hawk. He'd hang out for a while in vain and we always knew when he'd gone because the songbirds would return almost as suddenly as they'd left!

      In order to come up with the broken mirror photo idea, I would have had to have a shattered mirror sitting on my patio, and notice it capturing the sunrise. A mix of events that were unlikely to ever happen! I wonder what inspired Bing Wright?

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  9. Hi,Laloofah. It's nice to find wonderful things in your daily life. It's almost impossible to see a hawk sitting on a lamp post in our life. The last photo is very interesting for me too. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. So glad you enjoyed them all, Minoru, and it's fun to share something that you rarely (or never) get to see, since your blog is always doing that for me! :-)

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  10. Knowing I didn't have much time, I was just scrolling through your blog looking for eye candy and Bing Wright's photo of the sunset through the broken glass stopped me dead in my tracks!! Wow is that gorgeous. What a clever and beautiful idea! Thanks so much for sharing it.

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    1. Glad you liked it! (I fear it totally overshadowed my poor redwing hawk, but oh well - my eye usually goes straight to the eye candy too!)

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  11. I think Mr. Hawk saw you watching him and was doing those neat poses for your benefit....and ours, too ;-). Our hawk(s) have been absent of late, although I did see a couple of crows chasing one down the alley the other day.

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    1. I'm sure he was fully aware of me, though I was standing half a block away - they don't call them "hawk eyes" for nothing! I'd like to think he was posing specifically for my benefit. :-) The crows and magpies used to chase the hawks and eagles and just strafe and bomb the hell out of them when we lived on the mountain. Power in numbers, I guess!

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SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

  • THE HUMANE GARDENER ~ Nancy Lawson
  • THE WORLD WITHOUT US ~ Alan Weisman
There is still strong in our society the belief
that animals and the natural world have value
only insofar as they can be converted into revenue.
That nature is a commodity.
And that the American dream is one of unlimited consumption.
There are many of us, on the other hand,
who believe that animals and the natural world
have value by virtue of being alive.
That Nature is a community to which we belong
and to which we owe our lives.
And that the deeper American dream is one of unlimited compassion.

~John Robbins, "The Food Revolution"