My life has a superb cast but I can't figure out the plot.
~ Ashleigh Brilliant


Monday, November 14, 2011

Quilt Show 2011, Part 2


Yay, more quilts! :-)



Picking up where we left off in Part 1, we'll continue around the library mezzanine from left to right. Click on any photo for a larger version, and feel free to name your favorite(s) from this group in the comments!...


In the far left corner of the back wall is this sweet quilt, which won my instant affection since I'm always drawn to all the variations of the "Flying Geese" design...

Provence Flying Geese
Artist: Jane Rader & Friends
Quilted By: Janice Farr

To its right is this pretty autumnal quilt...

Leaves of Color
Technique: Pieced
Pattern by: Janet Ludwig
Artist: Monica St. Romain
Quilted By: Two Chicks Quilting
"Done in a Wyoming Guilt Workshop"

And to its right (are you detecting a pattern ~ pun intended ~ here?), is this fun quilt. While there are multiple signs throughout the display imploring people not to touch the exhibits (understandably!), this one actually has a sign encouraging you to touch and rearrange the blocks! Being a tactile person* (*I like touching stuff!), I appreciated that, and after taking this photo I dutifully swapped the positions of the two bottom blocks. And I was rather proud of my accomplishment, I must say. LOL...

Synergy Quilt
Technique: Various
Artist: Michelle Havenga

Some details from this quilt's display...

"Please Touch and Rearrange.
One of the interesting phases of a quilt
is placing the elements and rearranging them.
This piece allows people to move the pieces around.
This is a "Touch and Play" quilt. Have fun!"


And next to the Synergy Quilt was this stunner, the second of my top favorites because of its incredible colors and the beautiful quilting. (Besides, I know its artist, Buffy Shatek, and share the same first name with its quilter) :-) ...

Circle of Life
Technique: Paper Pieced
Artist: Buffy Shatek
Quilted By: Laurie Sheeley
"A color wheel variation"

Here are two closeup photos of it, showing more detail...



Another nice overview shot, looking from the top of the stairs toward the back wall...


I'll bet your eye fell on this one as soon as you saw the two overview photos in which it appears, because its colors really make it stand out...

Fire on the Mountain
Technique: Foundation Paper Pieced
Artist: Jo Hadley-Day
Quilted By: Laurie Sheeley

(AdventureJo - note the names!) ;-)

Further down this section we'll take a closer look at three more quilts displayed on the wall...


On the left is this one, which makes me think of the Scottish thistle but is quilted in a Hawaiian style...

Hawaiian
Technique: Needle turn Appliqué
Artist: Carol Dau
Hand Quilted By: Carol Dau
"The quilting is echo quilting as used on Hawaiian quilts."


In the middle of this group of quilts is this colorful yo-yo quilt (I love yo-yo quilts, we have an antique one folded on the foot of our bed)...

Yo-Yo Rows
Technique: Machine Binding
Artist and Quilter: Mitzi Siebert
"When I saw this quilt on the cover
I knew I wanted to make it. I needed a total of 409 yo-yos."


And finally in this row is this very large batik quilt. Again, I love batik and I love the colors in this, plus the fun flowers with their sparkly centers, so this is another of my favorites from this show (I also know the artist, Mary Jane Collins, because she works at the library's circulation desk)...

Bali pops Quilt Challenge
Technique: Pieced
Artist: Mary Jane Collins
Quilter: Becky Stedtnitz


Here are a couple more photos as we turn the corner of the mezzanine...


Bet by now you can guess which one of these is my favorite!...


If you guessed this one, you win! :-) It's not just a favorite of that group, it was another of my top favorites in the show...

Autumn Wind Storm
Technique: Machine Pieced and Quilted
Pattern by: Jo Hadley-Day
Artist: Jennifer Golden
"Jo Hadley-Day taught this Swirl Lone Star class last fall.
She designed the pattern for her company,
Kitchen Table Quilts. Laurie Sheeley inspired me
to use my right brain to quilt the Lone Star on my own!
Choosing the colors was a bit of a challenge.
I went way outside my comfort zone
and picked from the fall color palette.
Thank you to all my fellow quilters
for teaching me and inspiring me every time we meet!"


More quilts coming in Part 3! This is sew fun. ;-)

9 comments:

  1. Quilts are so luxuriant yet homey, aren't they? I just want to hug them all and wrap myself up. I have to say that although I tend to gravitate towards abstract art, when it comes to quilts, it's the traditional patterns that thrill me most.

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  2. ooh, the circle of life quilt is so pretty; I love the flourishes around the edges. The yo-yo quilt is pretty awesome too!

    I wouldn't have guessed that as your favorite, but it's a difficult call with quilts. It certainly evokes an autumn wind storm.

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  3. They were all awe-inspiringly beautiful, but as a tactile person myself I loved the touch and play quilt. There should be more fun in life. Much more.

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  4. So many masterpieces.
    I had no idea that such detailed work was still going on today.
    Wonderful to see your reportage.

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  5. The Bali Pops & Circle of Life are my favorites. I want them both! All of the quilts are gorgeous, though, of course. Such talent!

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  6. Andrea ~ They sure are! They make me feel instantly cozy when I see them, and all I can think of is curling up under one with a good book (especially when I see quilts in a library, lol) and a cup of tea! Interesting how your tastes vary between quilts and other art. Do you have a favorite traditional pattern?

    Rose ~ I know, it's pretty hard to beat that Circle of Life quilt - I love everything about it: the colors, the pattern, the black background (I'm especially drawn to quilts with vivid colors against black backgrounds!), the quilting.

    As for the Autumn Wind Storm, I always love the star designs, and thought this swirl star was really pretty. And I love bright colors and autumn colors best, though sometimes a pastel-colored quilt will win my heart. So I guess I'm not as easy to predict as I thought I was. :-)

    Ellie C ~ I'll go along with that!

    Hannah ~ Quilting is very popular in the US. There are even quite a few men who do it. It never occurred to me it might not be a big thing in some other countries! I'm glad you're enjoying the quilts on display!

    Molly ~ Another fan of bright colors, I see! :-) I should have guessed you'd love the Bali Pops one best, and how can anyone not be wowed by Circle of Life, as well as impressed by all the talent! I really look forward to the quilt show every year (funny it has no effect on my lack of desire to take up quilting, though!)

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  7. I'm having a pretty rotten morning so thank you for this beautiful oasis!

    Part 2 is Huge - I'm not sure I'll get to comment on everything although I assure you I looked at everything at least twice and then some three times!

    My favorite of the bunch would definitely be the "Bali pops quilt challenge". The artist did a great job with the cold and the hot colors creating great movement and those big yellow flowers are so bright and cheerful. I'd totally love to own that quilt! It's one of those where the same pattern done in different colors would quite likely not be nearly as wonderful so I want to say that Mary Jane can definitely be called an artist even if she used someone else's pattern! And I've gone back for a 4th and 5th look!!!

    I've seen lots of yoyo quilts but none like this. The ones I've seen were made of just yoyo's stitched to each other with maybe a lining. This one has the yoyo's stitched to the background and I like that alot. How is your yo-yo quilt made? I was really excited to see this variation that I had never seen before.

    My secont favorite was the "Fire on the Mountain". What gorgeous colors and I really like the border too. It's extra special that it's a callaboration between Jo and Laurie! Again the mix of hot and cold colors is delightful!

    I guessed wrong on the that last group of which would be your favorite. I picked the first one with the stars and the purples. But to my credit, they were both pretty amazing! "Autumn Wind Storm" is a fantastic variation on the Lone star. I'm not normally a fan of the lone star but this variation is wonderful. I also love that the corners are not blank. Many times they are and by adding the star blocks in more muted colors, it still gives the effect of plain squares on the corners but still adds interest - brilliant!

    I'm so happy you got to play with and touch one of the quilts. It is so hard at a quilt show to remember to "stay away" and that was a novel way to display a quilt in progress. She's a brave lady since all that touching may cause her edges to ravel so that was actually quite nice of her to do!

    I'm not surprised you loved Circle of Life. It didn't make it into my top choices (for the take home and keep list) but I'm sure impressed with the difficulty level of that quilt. That is a VERY difficult pattern and it looks beautifully executed.

    This was so much fun. I can't wait to see part 3! I hope you also get more visitors to this post - it deserves many more comments!!!!!

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  8. I love that Autumn Wind Storm, what fantastic colours!

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  9. Jo ~ I'm glad this post helped improve upon your crappy day, and really enjoy all your insights and opinions on these! Lots of fun to read, so thanks for investing the time it takes to write your comments!

    As I told you on the phone, I passed along your compliments to Mary Jane and she was very delighted and said, "Thank you!" :-)

    Our yo-yo quilt is as you describe; no background, just yo-yos stitched together.

    Funny how I surprised a few of you with my Autumn Wind Storm favorite! I like the colors in it even better than "Fire on the Mountain's," though I can't begin to explain why. Just do. :-) I've always liked the Lone Star pattern, but this one with the swirl effect makes the standard ones look boring in comparison! Love that effect. And I hadn't really paid much attention to the addition of muted star blocks to the corners, so that was one of your fun insights.

    Hopefully the Synergy quilt pieces were still in fine shape by the end of a month of touchy-feely fingers playing with them! :-)

    I'm not surprised that you're not surprised that Circle of Life was one of my favorites! :-) It IS one I'd love to take home to keep, but then I'd need about a 12-bedroom house to display all the quilts from this show alone I'd like to take home to keep! LOL (But Circle of Life might be the one that would go on our own bed! Or a prominent wall).

    I know, there were quite a few visits to this post (many by visitors from the Quilting Board forum), but surprisingly few comments (and NONE from the quilting forum!) I got so many more on Part 1 because it was part of a meme (the ABC Wednesday one). But I sure enjoyed the comments I did get! :-)

    Barbara ~ I thought so too! And what a perfect name for it!

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SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

  • INFERNO ~ Dan Brown
  • MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD & EVIL ~ John Berendt
  • MY NOTORIOUS LIFE: A NOVEL ~ Kate Manning
  • ONE SUMMER: AMERICA, 1927 ~ Bill Bryson
  • QUIET: THE POWER OF INTROVERTS IN A WORLD THAT CAN'T STOP TALKING ~ Susan Cain
  • THE BEAUTIFUL CIGAR GIRL ~ Daniel Stashower
  • THE DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY ~ Erik Larson
  • THE SHADOWS, KITH AND KIN ~ Joe R. Lansdale
  • THE TIPPING POINT ~ Malcolm Gladwell
There is still strong in our society the belief
that animals and the natural world have value
only insofar as they can be converted into revenue.
That nature is a commodity.
And that the American dream is one of unlimited consumption.
There are many of us, on the other hand,
who believe that animals and the natural world
have value by virtue of being alive.
That Nature is a community to which we belong
and to which we owe our lives.
And that the deeper American dream is one of unlimited compassion.

~John Robbins, "The Food Revolution"