My life has a superb cast but I can't figure out the plot.
~ Ashleigh Brilliant


Friday, March 12, 2010

Boo-Boo Paté


We've been making homemade soy milk since we bought our Soyabella about 3 years ago, but we never did anything with the okara (the high fiber, nutritious residue left over after making soy milk) except compost it. I knew you could use it in baked goods and other recipes, and that it was a wasteful shame not to, but for some reason I never felt inspired to try any of the recipes I'd found.

Until I came across Bryanna Clark Grogan's Okara Miso Paté recipe. Some of our favorite recipes are Bryanna's, so her Okara Miso Paté had instant street cred with us. (It helped that we also love miso!) I had to adjust the ingredient measurements since our Soyabella only yields 3/4 cup of okara, we like this best with half mellow white miso and half hacho (dark red) miso, and I skip the olive oil drizzle. But other than that, I haven't altered the original recipe. Well, except once by accident, which is why we now call this Boo-Boo Paté. Besides, I think that Boo-Boo Paté, in addition to being a less cumbersome name than Okara Miso Paté, is almost as much fun to say as "Baba Ghanoush!" (which just happens to be my favorite food name, as well as a favorite food item!) :-)

Boo-Boo Paté with whole wheat pita crisps

My boo-boo happened when I grabbed a jar of organic peanut butter instead of the jar of organic tahini. The jars are the same size and look enough alike (if you're just grabbing things out of the fridge without paying attention!), that it was an easy mistake. But how I failed to notice that the much darker and peanuty-smelling peanut butter was not, in fact, tahini is a disturbing mystery. I blissfully measured out and added the peanut butter to the paté, never noticing my error. When we ate the paté, we agreed it was the tastiest batch I'd ever made, though we had no idea why that was the case! It wasn't until I made it again a week later, when I again grabbed the jar of peanut butter thinking it was tahini but this time noticing my blunder, that I realized what I'd done. I refused to believe I'd used peanut butter instead of tahini without noticing, especially since I don't typically like peanut butter in anything except sandwiches and cookies. So this time, I used half tahini and half peanut butter. But we agreed that this batch didn't have as much flavor as the previous one. So the next time I used all peanut butter again, and Boo Boo Paté was here to stay! :-)

At least my ingredient goof worked out for the best,
instead of being a culinary catastrophe!

Alicia has been making okara paté delights lately too, including her own version of the Boo-Boo Paté.

For more vegan okara recipes, just do a search... there are many out there, from burgers and bread to cookies and quiche. Okara "Crab" Cakes is one I especially want to try soon. (Truly, had I known how much fun okara was, I'd have bought a bigger soymilk maker!) :-)

For more ways to enjoy miso, check out the VegNews article Mastering Miso.

Enjoy your weekend, even though it's shorter by an hour for many of us! >:-( (Why can't we "spring ahead" on Mondays instead? If ever there were a day that's worthy of having an hour lopped off it, it's Monday!)


3 comments:

  1. Love the title of this post. Boo-Boo Pate, you are so original! We loved your boo boo, it was brilliant.

    Okara crab cakes? Really! That just went on my to do list. Living in MD we have eaten many crab cakes. My hubby will love this (potentially, fingers crossed). I am going to get some soy beans soaking now so I can make this over the weekend. Yay!

    talk to you later,
    Ali

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your story about the origins of the name reminded me of a boo-boo dish Mike made. Instead of using tamari in a tofu satay, he used tahini. I had made it several times before but it was his first time making it, so we were wondering why it didn't turn out very well. Then we discovered his error. :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ali - I'm glad you like the name I gave this recipe. It sounded fun to me, and certainly fitting! :-) And hearing my klutzy boo-boo called brilliant totally made my day, so molte grazie! :-)

    I thought of you when I shared that okara crab cakes recipe! It sounds so good, I hope it's a hit with a couple of Mary-landers I know! ;-)

    Molly - Tahini instead of tamari... the difference of just a couple of letters, but no doubt a big flavor/texture difference! Still, it's too bad it didn't turn out. I wonder if a lot of recipes aren't the result of a mistake like that. The first time my mom (who hates cooking, so does it hurriedly and with a crappy attitude - the way I do math, lol) made her Thanksgiving dressing, she misread the recipe. It called for a teaspoon (or whatever) of thyme OR sage OR marjoram OR poultry seasoning, and instead she used them all! Best dressing EVER! Maybe that's the reason I'm always generous with my herb and spice measurements. ;-)

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SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

  • INFERNO ~ Dan Brown
  • MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD & EVIL ~ John Berendt
  • MY NOTORIOUS LIFE: A NOVEL ~ Kate Manning
  • ONE SUMMER: AMERICA, 1927 ~ Bill Bryson
  • QUIET: THE POWER OF INTROVERTS IN A WORLD THAT CAN'T STOP TALKING ~ Susan Cain
  • THE BEAUTIFUL CIGAR GIRL ~ Daniel Stashower
  • THE DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY ~ Erik Larson
  • THE SHADOWS, KITH AND KIN ~ Joe R. Lansdale
  • THE TIPPING POINT ~ Malcolm Gladwell
There is still strong in our society the belief
that animals and the natural world have value
only insofar as they can be converted into revenue.
That nature is a commodity.
And that the American dream is one of unlimited consumption.
There are many of us, on the other hand,
who believe that animals and the natural world
have value by virtue of being alive.
That Nature is a community to which we belong
and to which we owe our lives.
And that the deeper American dream is one of unlimited compassion.

~John Robbins, "The Food Revolution"