My life has a superb cast but I can't figure out the plot.
~ Ashleigh Brilliant


Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Erin Go Bragh



Once, back in Ireland, a long time ago,
She saw the little people dancing in the snow.
They didn't have shoes on their little cold feet;
They looked as though they hadn't had
a bite of food to eat,
But all of them were singing
and their singing sounded sweet.

Now she feeds the little birds that flutter in the snow.
They make her think of Ireland, a long time ago.

~Mildred Bowers Armstrong

Sure, an' ye know St. Patrick's Day is so festive, we've been celebratin' it all month! Watching Irish movies such as Dancing at Lughnasa (Meryl's my favorite actress), Michael Collins, and Waking Ned Devine (one of our all-time favorite movies, though filmed on the Isle of Man and not Ireland; if you haven't seen it then do yourself a favor and glom onto it!), listening to Celtic music (which we do all year long, it being one of our favorite genres), and eating green foods (see previous two posts re: wilted greens salad and potato-leek soup!)


This weekend the festivities continue, as I'm planning to make Mitten Machen's Tempeh-Stuffed Cabbage with smashed taters and Alicia's Cucumber and Lemon Water, a prettily green and refreshing-sounding beverage, indeed!


Deep peace of the running wave to you
Deep Peace of the flowing air to you
Deep Peace of the quiet earth to you
Deep Peace of the shining stars to you
Deep Peace of the gentle night to you
Moon and stars pour their healing light on you
Deep Peace to you.

While that is a favorite Gaelic blessing of mine, we will instead be raising our green-hued cucumber-lemon drink to one I love even more. It was a favorite of my Irish grandmother's (Ruth, whom some of you "met" briefly here)... at least, she claimed to be Irish. She was abandoned as a three day old infant, so she never knew her ethnicity. But she always claimed she was Irish because she was left with an Irish name (which may or may not have been real), had coal black hair and porcelain white skin, loved potatoes, and ~ most important of all ~ believed in leprechauns. :-) Anyway, here's her favorite Irish blessing...

May those that love us, love us;
And those that don't love us,
May God turn their hearts;
And if he doesn't turn their hearts,
May he turn their ankles,
So we'll know them by their limping!

Whatever green beverage and whatever toast you choose to salute the day (and the potato-loving, leprechaun-believing Irish in all of us), sure an' ye know I'm wishin' ye a foin St. Patty's Day, begorrah!


12 comments:

  1. La,

    We are all Irish today aren't we? Back in the day I would have been busy this evening consuming a green adult beverage (green beer). Alas it will be the cucumber and lemon water for me today.

    talk to you later!
    Ali

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh aye, lassie, we are all Irish today! :-)

    Enjoy your cucumber and lemon water! I will be joining you for a pint o'that from afar, though today I'll be using a regular cuke. (Using an English cucumber in a St. Patrick's Day beverage just doesn't seem right!) :-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Happy Paddy's Day Laloofah,

    Thanks for the fun post! Your grandmother with black hair and fair skins sounds pretty Irish to me...it's a total myth that Irish have red hair.

    Anyway, have you seen The Secret of Roan Inish? I think it would be a fun film in keeping with your Irish movie viewing.

    ReplyDelete
  4. And to you, My Wild Irish Rose! ;-)

    Yes, I think if my grandmother was indeed Irish, she was probably of Pictish descent! I've met or seen more black-haired Irish folk than redheaded ones.

    The Secret of Roan Innish was our St. Pat's feature film about two or three years ago, in fact. Quite right you are, it fits right in!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Laloo! I always love your holiday themed posts - very informative as always! I will now forever remember what St. Paddy drove out of Ireland. :-)

    Have a beautiful day!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Happy belated St. Patrick's Day to you, lass! I hope you enjoy the cabbage rolls! The filling is yummy, even if you don't go to the trouble of wrapping it up in cabbage leaves.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Laloofah,

    Please thank Val and Tino for the very adorable e-card they sent to Pim and Wallace.

    We sent along a Thank You email, let me know if it didn't get there...

    :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. VW - I'm glad you enjoy my holiday-themed posts, because I always enjoy creating them! (I'm a theme kinda girl). :-) And I'm happy to have added to your knowledge of Irish history with this little-known fact about St. Patrick. I think he either drove the snakes out in a Dodge Viper or a Mercury Sssssss Classsss, but I'm not sure. More research must be done! ;-)

    Mary - I'm looking forward to trying your cabbage rolls! And I will be going to the trouble of wrapping them in cabbage leaves, because a) that's the most Irish part of the recipe and b) I had to go back to the store to get the cabbage, which I'd forgotten on my first run-through! (It's been that kind of week).

    Rose - As you know by now, Val, Tino and I all enjoyed Pim and Wallace's lovely, thoughtful, creative and adorable thank-you! And we're glad you enjoyed the card. :-) xoxoxo

    ReplyDelete
  9. That cartoon with the snakes made me LOL quite a bit! That one has to be shared. :)

    Mike's a bit Irish, but other than me wearing a green shirt to work, we really didn't do anything for the day. It's always fun to see so many people wearing green, though. Such a soothing color, which is a good thing at work!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Molly - I know, I just love that cartoon, and it's definitely a fun one to share!

    I enjoyed seeing a lot of people wearing green on Wednesday too. I totally got into it... green shirt, green earrings, green jacket, and socks with shamrocks on them! (Will I never grow up? LOL)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Despite that I'm quite tardy for reading this blog, I really enjoyed it. My absolute favorite was the cartoon of St. Patrick driving out the snakes. 40+ years of hearing about that story and I had never quite pictured it like that - I love clever humor and that one had me ROTFL.

    I loved your Granny's toast (Irish grandmother's should be Granny's!) was great and unusual. Happy Belated St. Patrick's Day!

    This has nothing to do with the blog but my word verification for this post was "travel" - pretty nifty for AdventureJo - hope it's a prophesy!

    ReplyDelete
  12. AdventureJo - I think that cartoon is very clever too, and I bet now whenever you hear the reference to St. Patrick driving the snakes out of Ireland, this will be the image that springs immediately to mind forever more, and people will wonder why you're giggling! :-)

    Amusingly enough, I always called my Irish grandmother "Ging" (a gibberish sound I shrieked once as a wee tot that brought her on the run, earning her the name "Ging" from that day on!) She used to joke that she was my Chinese grandmother! :-)

    I hope your travel prophecy comes true! Knowing you, that's a sure thing!

    ReplyDelete

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SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

SOME CURRENT & RECENT READING...

  • INFERNO ~ Dan Brown
  • MIDNIGHT IN THE GARDEN OF GOOD & EVIL ~ John Berendt
  • MY NOTORIOUS LIFE: A NOVEL ~ Kate Manning
  • ONE SUMMER: AMERICA, 1927 ~ Bill Bryson
  • QUIET: THE POWER OF INTROVERTS IN A WORLD THAT CAN'T STOP TALKING ~ Susan Cain
  • THE BEAUTIFUL CIGAR GIRL ~ Daniel Stashower
  • THE DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY ~ Erik Larson
  • THE SHADOWS, KITH AND KIN ~ Joe R. Lansdale
  • THE TIPPING POINT ~ Malcolm Gladwell
There is still strong in our society the belief
that animals and the natural world have value
only insofar as they can be converted into revenue.
That nature is a commodity.
And that the American dream is one of unlimited consumption.
There are many of us, on the other hand,
who believe that animals and the natural world
have value by virtue of being alive.
That Nature is a community to which we belong
and to which we owe our lives.
And that the deeper American dream is one of unlimited compassion.

~John Robbins, "The Food Revolution"